On Sunday, millions of Americans watched as the Seahawks faced off against the Patriots. Admittedly, I was not one of those people. Even though I didn’t watch the game, I was still able to get what was most important: which team won, and which commercials aired.

Here are four lessons I learned from the 2015 Super Bowl Ads:

  1. According to Dove, soap is directly linked to a man’s strength and parenting skills.

In a 30 second commercial, the audience watches touching clips of father-child moments. A little after mid-way through, the question is shown “What makes a man stronger?” Is it spinach? Is it exercise and healthy eating? The audience is left to ponder this question for another five seconds before Dove gives the answer.

“Showing that he cares.” Four different Dove products are then shown in a dark gray background.

Lesson learned, Dove. In order for a man to show that he cares, and therefore get stronger, he needs to buy Dove products. Hygiene=showing care=strength. Hm. Sounds legit.

  1. Mindy Kaling is not invisible.

Actress and comedian Mindy Kaling thinks she’s invisible because of other people treating her as though she were. She is then told at the very end by actor Matt Damon that she is not, in fact, invisible. And then Nationwide’s logo appears.

  1. Apparently Liam Neeson plays Clash of the Clans, and takes it quite seriously.

At the beginning of the commercial, the audience watches as colorful videogame clips are played out. Transition to Liam Neeson standing in a coffee shop, a frown on his taut face as he reads the single word on the screen: revenge. He’s angry at a fellow player, outwardly expressing his frustration in his well-known gruff, intimidating, and dedicated tone. The barista mispronounces Neeson’s first name as he calls out his order. Neeson corrects him. The video game scenes return for a brief second, and then Clash of the Clans shows its logo.

Lesson learned. Be careful who you’re playing with on online games. You never know if you’re playing against Liam Neeson…

  1. According to Carl’s Jr., watching a mostly naked model eating a hamburger will make you want to eat a Carl’s Jr. hamburger as well.

What is it with Carl’s Jr. airing commercials of half-naked young ladies eating hamburgers? The commercial features an assumed naked woman, model Charlotte McKinney, walking through what appears to be a farmer’s market.

What does an assumed nudist walking through a farmer’s market have to do with Carl’s Jr.?

The product is the “All Natural Burger,” which apparently has no steroids, antibiotics, or added hormones. Nothing says un-tampered burger like a naked lady walking in a public area.

 

Those are four of the many lessons I gained from some of this year’s Super Bowl commercials. I can go on and on based on the other commercials I saw, but for the sake of time and word count, I’ll leave it at four.

What did you learn from the 2015 Super Bowl commercials?